anghara (anghara) wrote,
anghara
anghara

Lost and won

Everyone's got an opinion. I expected that. I expected the polarisation - the split between the "I loved it" and "I loathed it" camps. "Lost", whatever else it did, allowed nobody to simply sit on the fence on this one.

So, it's over.

For the 0.01% who (a) still want to see the end of "Lost", (b) still haven't and (c) have somehow managed to avoid the spoilers so far,

When this sixth and last season began, I turned to rdeck and I said, "They'd better pull a rather large rabbit out of this hat in the end, because otherwise I am going to be very very mad..."

The big question now is, DID they?

This is "Lost". There are two answers to every question. So here are the two answers to this one.

1) NO, they did not.

The point is, the could not have. There is too much here. "Lost" is a little like life, really, where every now and again things wander off into an alley way and get stuck at a brick wall and go no further, or else meander off into a wrong turn and go into a wholly unexpected direction, or else we meet people we think are going to be very important in our lives (and they turn out not to be) or think are merely passing acquaintances or even mere strangers (and they turn out to be a foundation of our existence). "Lost" is like that, a LOT like that.

Yes, there are answers I would have liked to have at the end, and never got. Who exactly were the Dharma initiative and why were they there? What the hell were the numbers about anyway? Why polar bears? Why couldn't the women of the Others bear children on the island? What the hell was that statue all about, who built it and why, and how come Jacob ended up living in a ginat foot like the Old Woman in a Shoe from the nursery rhyme? Who exactly was Ilana? There had to be more to the story of Richard. Who was the woman who raised Jacob and the Smoke Monster, REALLY?

I could go on. They could have carried on this story for twenty years while they got on with answering these questions.

They did not. perhaps they were wise. Because, in the end...

IT DID NOT MATTER

Because, (2) YES, they did.

There was a rabbit. If there had not been a rabbit, I would not have found myself in tears five times during that finale. And the reason for the tears?

The expression in Sawyer's eyes when he said, "J-J-Juliet...?"

The raw vulnerability of thaht arch-villain, Ben, sitting there on the outside of it all in the garden of the church, murmuring that he'll stay on for a bit, there are things he needs to finish up.

Jin and Sun, locking eyes over the ultrasound machine, and remembering toghether.

Hurley, straightening up under the load that had been placed on his shoulders and accepting his role with the nobility of a true-born King.

Sayid, reaching out to Shannon.

Desmond, murmuring to Kate, "Now do you understand?"

Claire and Charlie weeping over newborn Aaron.

They were all remembering - they were all remembering LOVE. And there was something utterly powerful in that, something visceral, something that I NEVER really expected to see explored in contemporary American television.

In the end, what summed it up for me was the moment in which Ben, looking at John Locke wheeling up the church path in his chair, says quietly, "I don't think you need to be in that chair any more."

And Locke smiles... and slowly puts one foot on the ground, then the other, then pushes the chair away and stands up on his own two feet.

"Lost" the series was our chair, in a way. But we don't need to be in it any more.

*Now* do you understand?

And when your time comes to walk into the light... will you remember love?
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